Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Make new wood look old and weathered

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make new wood look old and weathered in minutes!
 Happy Halloween y'all! After all the costume ideas going in my head, I ended up going for the easiest one. A pregnant hick. Maybe I can spice it up and be pregnant with my cousin's baby? A little too much??? I tried the pregnant cheerleader costume. My butt has grown bigger than I thought lol. It no longer fits in the skirt. Oh well. So a pregnant hick I am :) I guess the next question is, am I too old to be dressing up for Halloween??? lol

Old Weathered Wood Look
Anyways.
Okay. So back to the real topic of discussion ;) How to get new wood looking old. I had a vision for my farmhouse table when I was making it. I knew exactly how I wanted it to look, but didn't know how to get it there. So I almost just caved in and wanted to paint it all white. Which I still think would have looked great. Maybe distress it a little around the edges. But then the hubs wanted it all a dark brown. I told him that looks too much like our current table, and since eventually this table will move inside, I didn't want that. The whole purpose of making the table was to make it a little lighter colored since I didn't like the dark brown we currently had. I almost wanted it grey. But not real grey, a weathered grey.

So I started to experiment getting that weathered grey. I know there is grey wood stain, but I was too lazy to go to the store and find it lol. I figured that would be a last case scenario. So I was going to use what I had on hand and come up with something -dark walnut stain, chestnut stain, and white paint.

So I took a couple of approaches that I wasn't completely thrilled about. Staining and then white washing. Painting and then staining. White washing and then staining.

I think my favorite out of these was the white paint distressed with walnut stain. Which I was going to use until I tried one last thing...
And got the perfect look. A perfect distressed weathered greyish brownish whitish finish. And on a plus, the hubs loved it too.


Step one to getting this finish:
Sand your wood. Try to get out the weird manmade textures. There was a ton on mine, so I had to sand pretty good. Also sand the corners and edges to make them less jagged. This last part doesn't have to do with the finish, but it helps :) I used 120 medium grit paper for this process. Don't over sand and get rid of all the wood grain because you'll be sanding again later and need those parts that are somewhat still 'raised'.
Step Two:
Paint the wood with one coat of white paint. I used White Linen from Glidden, but any white paint would work. The paint I used was a latex paint. Let it dry.

Step Three:
Sand again.This time I used a paint stripping sandpaper in 80 grit.  When sanding this time around, just sand enough that some wood shows through on the higher surfaces, but still leave enough white paint behind. There's really no right way to do this. Just start sanding and remember that the wood that shows through will be holding the most stain, so if you want more brown, then sand a lot, if you want more white, then sand a little.
Step Four:
Stain. I used Minwax's dark walnut, put it on a rag, and just went up and down each slat of wood until I got the look I wanted. If I wanted it darker in some places, I would put another coat on.
The nonpainted wood picks up the stain beautifully and brings to life all the characteristics of the wood. The left over white paint changes to a pretty weathered grey :)
Step Five:
Seal. I used polycrylic to seal mine.

Here's the difference on the before piece of pine 2x6 and the finished:

And there you have it! How to get new wood looking old in pretty much 4 easy steps. 5 steps if you want to seal it.
Old Weatherd Wood Look
I wanted to do the whole table this finish, but when it got down to it -staining, painting, sanding, staining and bending down while 7 1/2 months pregnant didn't sound so fun.
And trying to get in all those grooves and joints and what not, well, it just wasn't going to happen lol
So for the base of the table, I used the walnut stain. Simple. Got the hubs to sand the legs a little. Then just one coat of stain and sealer and done.
Table Finishes
I think the contrast from the top really works well, and it pulls out those darker hues. When staining, make sure you work it in really well on the edges of the wood to pull that distressed and very used look. You can kind of see that in the picture above and below.
DIY Farmhouse Table

You can find the plans on how to make this farmhouse table by clicking here.

Until next time! Have a great Halloween and keep safe!

Also, before you start, it is always a good idea to test this on a scrap piece of the same type of wood you are finishing. You may have to tweak this technique depending on the wood you use. It's better to get your technique and look down on small scale before you go large scale :) 

32 comments:

  1. So pretty! We have the exact same table, but with white on the bottom and dark stain on the top. I love yours in reverse! Thanks for the tips on the weathered look.

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  2. Thank you for sharing this! great information! I'm pinning…
    Leslie
    House on the Way

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  3. pregnant halloween costumes are hard! lol! Popped over from HOH link party- new follower!

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  4. amazing! That wood looks so perfectly weathered! thanks for sharing, pinning this!
    gail

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  5. Looks great! I really love your ideas and your blog. Kinda wish you'd share a photo of you in your Halloween costume, though....!

    Tina
    singin(at)compuserve(dot)com

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  6. That looks amazing! I tried a few different techniques for my dining room table but this one is genius. Definitely pinning!

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  7. Looks gorgeous. We're building one just like yours! I was wondering if you painted/stained the parts not seen? Not looking forward to staining the undersides :(

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    1. I find that staining is a lot easier than painting, so I stained them.

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  8. Thank you for posting your tutorial and your table turned out beautiful! I've got his linked to my weathered wood post too today, well done!

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  9. This is exactly what I have been looking for. Thank you so much for sharing! Danielle B. at Welcome Company.

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  10. I LOVE this look. I am book marking this page so I can try it myself one day. I have a farmouse table table I built a few years ago and it needs a makeover. I love this look. Gorgeous!

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  11. Important question: Are you using oil paint or latex white paint because you are using the walnut stain which I think is an oil. Not sure what should be mixed. Also, if you're keeping the table outside are you covering it with something to protect it because paint protects but you're sanding it back to the wood and the stain does not protect. So maybe bees wax (Michaels Craft Store) or parafin wax on top? Or polyurethane but satin (no shine) but make sure they are compatible. I know you can get water based stain as well. I've used Minwax charcoal grey (which has a bluish tint. -kyle

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    1. As I mentioned in the post, the paint is latex and yes, I protected the table using some poly. This is good for weather and for whatever else gets spilled on it during use :)

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  12. I just tried this and my latex paint with walnut minwax stain came out hideous. Did you paint the barewood and THEN paint it white and stain again after sanding? Or paint, sand, stain only? My white paint absorbed the stain and I had to wipe off, which gave it more of a whitewash with dirty water effect, lol. What kind of wood did you use? I'm wondering if maybe the pine (common board at Home Depot) just doesnt have enough grain movement or isnt raised enough. hmmmm....thanks!

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  13. The stain you used, was it oil based or water based? How thick was the paint, since you did only one coat?

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    1. I'm not sure about the stain, I'm assuming it is oil since it's a bugger to get off of anything. The paint was just enough to cover the color of the wood, you can somewhat see the thickness in the pictures if you look hard.

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  14. It's absolutely beautiful! Pinned it!

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  15. I guess I won't post my question, since it looks like questions don't get answered here.....

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  16. I will answer your questions, I just do it through email so it never shows up on here.

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  17. Thanks for sharing your creation. I just redid my bar with your idea.

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  18. Beautiful result of your hard work...congrats

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  19. Just tried this and now I'm bawling by my custom made quad bunk beds. It looks so awful. I can't believe I didn't try this on a scrap piece first. Your table looks amazing but mine is just a muddy mess. One thing I learned since my husband first started doing it"wrong" is that it looks a thousand times better to stain your sanded wood and then lightly brush a gray paint over it. Plus you wouldn't have to sand in between coats. Good luck everyone!

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    1. I am so sorry to hear this Karen! It may work differently with different woods..and of course, techniques from person to person will vary no matter what. I'll add a disclosure in my post to make sure you test it on a scrap piece first. Thank you and I hope it ends up looking great in the end!

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  20. what wood is your table made out of?

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  21. Thanks for posting this tutorial. I'll be making some "vintage" frames for my upcoming wedding. My sample proof of concept piece came out just like yours so will tackle the frames soon.

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  22. I am trying the same technique as you used on this table and I am not sure if I'm doing it right. What paint finish did you use? Matte, semi-gloss or high gloss? When you sanded and applied the stain, did it wipe off the white paint or did it turn everything a dirty purply color. I used a white matte paint and everything turned dirty purple and the paint didn't wipe off it just stuck to the paint. I have been looking at your pictures and I can't tell if that is the way it should be. Thanks for your help

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    Replies
    1. What paint finish was your white paint? FLAT, SEMI GLOSS, HIGH GLOSS? Was it latex or oil based? I am using a flat interior latex paint and a dark walnut oil stain and everything turns a light plum when I go to wipe the stain off the paint. The stain makes the exposed wood semi dark, but when you wipe it off, it turns the rest of the white paint purple. Is this the expected result? Thank you

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  23. WHERE oh where can I get a copy of that construction pattern / build sheet for the table?? Very cool!!

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  24. Hi Alicia, I tried this technique on a project of mine, and it looks great, much like your pictures. I used Glidden latex-based paint, followed by Minwax stain. The problem is that the stain doesn't seem to want to stick to the paint, so it rubs off on my hands any time I touch the project. Any tips for how to solve this? I haven't applied polycrylic yet, do you think that would solve the problem?

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    Replies
    1. I am having the oposite problem. I am using a flat white interior latex paint and the oil stain sticks to exposed wood, but the stain also sticks to the paint making everything a light purple/plum in color. Mark, what latex finish paint are you using? Flat, semi gloss, High gloss? I am going to try a latex high gloss (waiting for it to dry now). I will then sand it and apply the dark walnut oil based stain and see how it turns out. I am thinking there is somthing about the paint finish that affects the total color of the wood and how well it sticks/doesn't stick to the sanded paint and exposed wood. I will post my findings as soon as I can.

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  25. I am about todo this technique on a wall in my house (the old 70's fake wood paneling) it is already rough textured. I also would like to know the gloss of the paint-- I would think that a flat would just absorb the stain and a high gloss would just allow the stain to wipe off. Please reply with the finish of the paint.

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